Monday, November 12, 2018

Writing for Children—A Noble Calling


By Michelle Medlock Adams @INwritergirl

When I was in first grade, Mrs. True made an announcement that would forever change my life.“We’re having a poetry contest this week,” she said, “so use today and tomorrow to come up with your best poem.”

We had just studied the various types of poems, and I decided I really liked the ones that rhymed. In fact, I had checked out every book of rhyming poetry I could find from our school library, and I’d read them all—twice.

As my classmates wrote about their parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, brothers and sisters, I carefully crafted the words to my poem: “I Love Penny.” Penny was my 7-year-old wiener dog and my best friend in the whole world.

My poem went a little something like this: “Penny is my very best friend. I’ll love her to the very end. She’s a very special wiener dog. I love her though she smells like a hog…”

Okay, so I wasn’t exactly a first-grade Dr. Seuss, but my poem was good enough to earn first prize. (I guess the other first-grade poets must’ve been really bad.) At any rate, I won a few sparkly pencils and the honor of going first in the lunch line that afternoon. Mrs. True also displayed my poem in the front of the room for all to see. I stared at my winning poem all afternoon, and in my mind, I was already crafting a follow-up rhyme.

That’s the day I became a writer. I wanted to write all the time, and so I did. I wrote during recess while other kids played tag and climbed on the monkey bars. I completely fell in love with words.

I wrote a play in fifth grade that we performed for all of the fifth grade classes. I wrote short stories in junior high for a literary magazine. And I wrote many articles for my high school newspaper before majoring in journalism at Indiana University.

Though I began my career writing news stories for a daily paper, my career path took an unexpected turn when we moved to Texas so I could write features and personality profiles for an international ministry magazine. After a little while, the editor came to me and said, “You have kids, right?”

“Yes,” I answered.

“Great, you can write some kids' stories for our children’s outreach.”

I remember thinking, Just because I have kids doesn’t mean I know how to write for themBut I was a journalist, so I began researching the world of writing for children, and I once again fell in love. Head over heels. That was more than twenty years ago, and I’ve been lovesick ever since. 

Creating stories for children—stories that teach, entertain, encourage and inspire—is a noble calling. It’s a calling I don’t take for granted, and neither should you.

No matter how you fell in love with writing for children, I’m just happy you did. Let me encourage you to stay the course. Never think your work or your words are less important or less powerful simply because they are for kids. Actually, they are more important and more powerful because they are for kids.
You’re a part of a very special club—a society of writers who woo children to fall in love with words and continue that love affair their whole lives through. 

You’re the writer who transports children to far-off lands and make-believe worlds. You’re the writer who causes children to dream a little bigger, laugh a little harder, feel a little deeper, and care a little more. You’re a children’s writer, crafting copy on the very hearts of your readers, so do it well, and do it with enthusiasm.

What do you love most about writing for children? We would love to hear from you.


TWEETABLE
Creating stories for children—stories that teach, entertain, encourage and inspire—is a noble calling. via@INwritergirl (Click to tweet.)

Michelle Medlock Adams is an inspirational speaker, award-winning journalist and best-selling author of more than 90 books, earning top honors from the Associated Press, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Hoosier State Press Association. Since graduating with a journalism degree from Indiana University, Michelle has written more than 1,500 articles for newspapers, magazines and websites; acted as a stringer for the Associated Press; written for a worldwide ministry; helped pen a New York Times Bestseller; served as a TV host for TBN’s “Joy in Our Town” show; and blogged for Guideposts.


Today, she is President of Platinum Literary Services—a premier full-service literary firm—and she serves as chairman of the board for Serious Writer Inc. and teaches courses for Serious Writer Academy.  She is also a weekly columnist for a Midwestern newspaper and serves as assistant acquisitions editor for Little Lamb Books.

Michelle is married to her high school sweetheart, Jeff, and they have two grown daughters, Abby and Allyson, two sons-in-law, and one grandson, as well as a miniature dachshund, a rescue Shepherd/Collie mix, and two cats. When not writing or teaching, Michelle enjoys bass fishing and cheering on the Indiana University Basketball team and the Chicago Cubbies.





Monday, November 5, 2018

Tricky and Confusing Words Part Two

By Andrea Merrell

In my last post, we looked at many tricky and confusing words that most writers wrestle with. This week, let’s look at a few more:

Advice vs. Advise
  • Advice is a noun that means a recommendation. (Jim gave Charlie some great advice.)
  • Advise is a verb that denotes the act of giving a recommendation. (Charlie was glad that Jim was able to advise him.)

Peak, Peek, Pique
  • Peak means the top of a mountain. (Shelly can see the peak of Grandfather Mountain from her front porch.)
  • Peek means to take a quick glimpse. (Robin took a peek out the window to see who was at the door.)
  • Pique means to irritate or stimulate. (Mandy was piqued by the clerk’s rude behavior. The fashionable window display was meant to pique the interest of customers.)

Compliment vs. Complement
  • Compliment means to praise. (Rusty was known for giving sincere compliments.)
  • Complement means the amount, quantity, or something that completes or brings to perfection. (The violin music was the perfect complement to the exquisite meal. The hotel has a perfect complement of staff at the moment.)

Desert vs. Dessert
  • Desert is a desolate place (noun) or to abandon (verb). (Take plenty of water on your trip to the desert. If I go to the party with you, please don’t desert me.)
  • Dessert means our favorite sugary treat. (We have chocolate cake for dessert.)

Elicit vs. Illicit
  • Elicit means to evoke or cause. (A bad review will elicit a negative response.)
  • Illicit means illegal or something that is taboo. (The police arrested the man for the sale of illicit drugs.)

Brake vs. Break
  • Brake means a device for slowing or stopping a vehicle (noun). (Carrie slammed her foot on the brake.) As a verb it means to decelerate or stop. (You need to brake when approaching a traffic light.)
  • Break means to interrupt or separate into pieces (verb). (The meeting will now break for ten minutes. Casey decided to break the candy in half and share with her sister.) As a noun it means a pause or interruption. (The break lasted longer than we expected. After working all day, it was time to take a break.)

So, Sow, Sew
  • So means to a great extent (adverb). (It happened so fast I could hardly take it in.) As a conjunction, it means therefore or in order that. (They whispered so they wouldn’t disturb anyone in the workshop.)
  • Sow means to scatter or plant. (The farmer has a lot of seeds to sow.)
  • Sew means to create or repair with a needle and thread. (We will have to sew the seams together.)

Altar vs. Alter
  • Altar means a kneeling rail in a Christian church where people go to pray or the table used for communion. (The pastor invited people to come to the altar for prayer.)
  • Alter means to change or modify. (We may have to alter our plans if it’s going to rain.)

Lose vs. Loose
  • Lose means to suffer a loss. (Be sure not too lose your car keys.)
  • Loose means something is not tight. (Amanda wore loose-fitting clothes for her workout.)

Course vs. Coarse
  • Course means a direction or route (noun.) (Let’s change our course and head north.) As a verb it means to move without obstruction. (Tears coursed down Cynthia’s cheeks.)
  • Coarse means rough in texture or crude. (The fabric is very coarse. Coarse language has become acceptable in most television programs.)
Bare vs. Bear
  • Bare mean naked, uncovered, or simple. (The two-year-old was bare from the waist up. Those are the bare facts.)
  • Bear means an animal. (Watch out for bears when you hike in the mountains.
Here vs. Hear

  • Here means in this particular spot. (Put the package right here.)
  • Hear means to listen. (Did you hear what I said earlier?)
Then vs. Than
  • Then indicates time or means next. (The meeting is at 4:00 p.m. I will be there then. Carol entered the contest, then won first place.)
  • Than is used for comparison. (I'd rather go to Pennsylvania than New York.)
Passed vs. Past
  • Passed is the past tense of pass. (Mandy passed me on her way to the library.)
  • Past means the time before the present. (It's time to stop living in the past. Cheryl has been working part-time for the past few months. 
  • Note: Past can be used as an adjective, preposition, noun, or adverb. Be sure to use it correctly. Example: Rick can't go past the bakery without going in.)

Some of these may seem simple, but as an editor, I see these common mistakes quite often. The best rule of thumb is: when in doubt ... look it up.

Can you add to the list? What words do you struggle with? We would love to hear from you.

(Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net and Stuart Miles.)

TWEETABLE